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Refashioned One Cardigan!

Irene from Serger Pepper Today’s blog guest is Irene from Serger Pepper.  She’s sharing with us a tutorial for how to refashion your One Cardigan for a whole new look!You can get a copy of the One Cardigan either as a single PDF HERE or as part of Issue 6 HERE.

Today I’m here to show you how you can make the OneCardigan with a slightly ruffled collar and refashioned set-in sleeves.

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As always, when refashioning, you won’t probably find the exact garments I’m using.
And this is good, because you’re going to end with a one-of-a-kind creation!

I have used a black and gold knitted long sleeved shirt and a pair of drawstring sweatshirt pants (+ scraps of a black T-shirt for the back bodice lining).
My shirt had a fun-shaped collar, so I decided to keep it as part of the final design; if you want to recreate it, fold the fabric and cut out the following shape:

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To mix up things, I decided to skip the petal skirt portion, lengthening the bodice parts until they hit right below the waistline (in size 5 I have added 16 cm, which are around 6 1/4”).
You can decide to make it longer, to the hips, or maybe make it short like a shrug, cutting the bodice pieces to their original length and leaving out the petal skirt pieces.

Note that refashioning sleeves you will save yourself a lot of time and troubles! Before you go on and cut them out of the fabric, you need to consider:
1) there’s no need of hem allowance
2) there’s no need of underarm seam allowances
→ You need to cut off 1 cm (3/8”) from hem and underarm lines from the paper pattern piece!

If you plan to sew your OneCardigan again in this size, I would suggest you trace your sleeve pieces into a second piece of paper, so you won’t make a mess the next time you’re sewing it from regular fabric (not upcycling).

Alternatively, you can just re-print the sleeve piece, using the practical print chart included in the OneCardigan pattern, that will tell you exactly which pages you need to print for your sleeve in your size!

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To make pieces A and B longer, place them above the fabric//shirt and measure the length you decide to add from the bottom edge of the pattern piece toward the bottom of the fabric//shirt.

Instead of the tie or the ribbon originally included in the OneCardigan pattern, I used the drawstring that came with the sweatshirt pants: “use what you’ve got” is my mantra!
Treat the drawstring exactly as you would do with a ribbon, following the original pattern instructions.

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Mark down (onto the paper pattern piece) the length you are adding, so you’re sure to make them even (you need to add the same length to the 4 front bodice pieces and top the back pieces, on both lining and main fabrics, parallel to the bottom edge of the pattern piece).

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To get more fabric out of my recycled pants, I prefer to start cutting them along crotch seams and inside leg seams.
Laying them flat above the sewing table allows me to better judge how much fabric I have and I can better control grainlines (which are important also when refashioning).

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Place paper pattern pieces on top of the pants. Remember to add length at the bottom and to cut 2 mirrored pieces !

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If you, like me, don’t have enough fabric to cut the back bodice piece on fold, cut it in two pieces! But remember to add 1 cm (3/8”) along the center back seam!

As you can see I had to include a small graphic into one of the back pieces: I was able to keep it into the seam allowances, so it won’t show into the outside of the finished OneCardigan!

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This is what you should have now:

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Collar
The collar I am reusing was slightly longer than the neckline.
I decided to gently ruffly it to add interest.
To do that I ran a basting stitch along the opened curved side (see the dotted red line?), then gathered, pulling the bobbin thread.

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To attach it to the bodice, I followed the pattern instructions given for the hooded version, aligning the collar ends to the ends of the neckline instead of to the center front markings.

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Here’s the collar fully basted to the outside layer of the bodice:

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Add the lining along the neckline and vertical front seam, following the original pattern instructions.
To hem the OneCardigan without the petal skirt, simply run a seam along the bottom hem of the bodice pieces, placing main and lining fabrics right sides facing.
When you’re done, trim off the corner on front to reduce bulk when you turn it right side out. Reduce seam allowances around the upper rounded corner and clip any other curves.

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Having a black and gold lining, I thought it was fun if I let it peek out, for a faux piping effect. Do so that I left it out just a smidge toward the outside, along the edges, then I steam pressed (using a press cloth and a clapper) them in place, to have a crisp and sharp edge.

It’s starting to look like a real cardigan, isn’t it?

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Close one of the side seams, right sides together, in one only long seam starting from the lining underarm, ending to the outside fabric underarm, matching the seam you’ll meet around the half-point.

Take it slowly, stop and re-align the fabric if you need to: it will be perfect, at the end!
Just double check you’re not catching your tie/string into your seams!
Press seam open, then press the bottom hem. Repeat for the other side seam.

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I would suggest you baste together the two layers of fabrics around each armhole, wrong sides together, to ensure you catch all the layers when you attach the sleeves in the last step.
To do that, align the raw edges and stitch them inside the seam allowances.

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Take one sleeve and place it next to one of the armholes, exactly where it will be once stitched in place.

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Slip your hand inside the armhole, from the inside of the cardigan. Grab the sleeve and place it inside the armhole, matching:
–    shoulder seams (on both layers) to center of the sleeve head
–    underarm seam to side seams (on both layers)

Align the raw edges and stitch together, then finish the edges with a zig-zag stitch or a serger.

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And you’re done!

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Now that you’ve learned how to hack your OneCardigan, you should try shopping in your closet searching for a couple of garments to be refashioned…

Give a new life to your pre-loved clothes, it’s fun, it costs nothing and can be a great way to try a pattern style before you cut precious fabric, just to see if you like it.

We did it for this refashioned OneCardigan and we’re absolutely loving the result!

Hugs from Italy, Irene SergerPepper.com

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{ 1 comment }

 


1 Comment to “Refashioned One Cardigan!”

  1. Cucicucicoo 29/03/2015 at 7:44 am

    Great version of the One Cardigan! What you did here with the sleeves is exactly what I did for my version of it! 🙂 Lisa

    Reply

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